Astronomy, the Night Sky and Photography

The Lunar Eclipse April 2014

See the lunar eclipse April 2014 for North American skywatchers

Credit: Wiki Commons

Credit: Wiki Commons

Its the first of two total lunar eclipses in 2014!

The April 15th lunar eclipse can be seen in its entirety across most of North America and western South America. Get some shut eye before if you have to because it’s a late night/early-morning event with mid-eclipse occurring 3:46 a.m. EDT.

Looking south-west at 3:46am EDT the moon will darken as it enters the Earth's shadow on the early morning of April 15. Made with Stellarium

INFOGRAPHIC: Looking south-west at 3:46am EDT the moon will darken as it enters the Earth’s shadow on the early morning of April 15. Made with Stellarium

How to see the lunar eclipse April 2014

The event starts earlier than that at 12:54 am EDT and over the course of the next few hours you’ll be able to see the Moon begin to slowly darken. By 2am EDT half the Moon will be eclipsed and totality begins at 3:07 am EDT. For nearly another hour and a half our lunar friend will appear red/copper – a blood red moon! The totality lasts 78 minutes.

As an added bonus to this event, the bright star Spica is very close by the moon and the red planet Mars is also not to far away. (see infographic)

For an overview of this lunar eclipse and more watch this video from Science at NASA…

About the author... Shawn Nielsen

Shawn Nielsen (Stardaug) is a Canadian astrophotographer who images the night sky from Ontario, Canada. He writes and blogs about what you can see on clear starry nights and enjoys sharing the wonders of the cosmos with others who have an interest in astronomy and stargazing. He is a member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.

The Lunar Eclipse April 2014 was last modified: April 14th, 2014 by Shawn Nielsen

The Cosmos Await...

Canadian astrophotographer Shawn Nielsen (@Stardaug) of Kitchener-Waterloo images the night sky above Ontario, Canada and shares the wonders and mysteries of the cosmos with others interested in Astronomy. You can contact Shawn here.

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